Monthly Archives: March 2012

miTunes: the voices in my head can harmonize

Treble clef with transposition

Treble clef with transposition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I love music.

While it may sound a little cheesey to say music feeds the soul, I find music can help recharge my internal battery or calm my emotional storm. And not only do I love music on a deeply personal level, I find discovering a film score or collection of songs can take me and my writing to a whole other level.

All the way back to high school, I recall putting together “soundtracks”. While others simply refered to them as mixed tapes, I always seemed to wrap a theme around the songs. At first the tapes started out as “fast songs” and “slow songs” and, as an old friend simply called his tape, “good stuff” (for fear of getting in trouble with his parents, he refrained from originally wanting to name his mix “great shit”).

A few years after high school, I began working on my comic series, Chance and I stumbled across a couple of songs that fit the theme of my series perfectly. Next thing I knew, I was digging through my collection of music, looking for the perfect songs to put together. My search soon spilled over into other’s music and, a few weeks later, I had completed my very first soundtrack.

Across the past 20 years I have assembled a soundtrack for every story I’ve written. From Nine Inch Nails and Sisters of Mercy to Enya and John Williams, each soundtrack has helped me find my voice and draw inspiration from. A good portion of my book, Jac And The City Of 1,000 Worlds, takes place in the fantastical and otherworldly city of Meridian. Looking through my collection, I found myself listening to a collection of Enigma, Loreena McKennitt, and Dead Can Dance, along with the score to Harry Potter And The Sorcerer’s Stone. Now that the story has moved to a setting in late 1800’s London, my musical choices are shifting more towards the latter Harry Potter films (darker, heavier) the steampunk group Abney Park and the ghost-trance Burial.

Music means a lot to me on many different levels. Not only can can music convey love and despair, but it can also invoke  the world in my mind and the cast of characters residing inside.

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Not able to put in a new post this week, so I thought you all would enjoy one from the archives.

Cheers.

Daedalus Press

It was quite the evening yesterday. My wife and I spent the majority of it cleaning/gutting/reorganizing the garage. “Why?” you may ask yourself. Uh… “Cuz we’re dumb” would be the knee-jerk answer, but in this case, we were looking for…something…a while back and couldn’t find it. We knew it was in the garage, specifically in one of the boxes or tubs and so we spent–

Really? Do you care? You just want to know about the Parrot Walk and Spider Assassin. It is what drew you here in the first place, right? It’s all about clever title, you know. Marketing. Grab their attention. “Flash Before Cash” was the motto of a successful coffee house I used to work in years back. That place was awesome. It was–

Holy crap, I’m doing it again.

Coffee has no effect on me. Nope. None at all.

So. Where was I?

Right. The garage.

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A lengthy, but worthwhile, post refuting Scott Turow’s letter regarding a pending antitrust lawsuit against five publishing houses and Apple.

David Gaughran

On Thursday it was reported that the U.S. Justice Department was preparing to sue five of the largest publishers, and Apple, for (allegedly) colluding to fix e-book prices. Despite the shock expressed in some quarters, this is hardly a bolt from the blue.

It’s almost a year since the European Union raided the offices of several publishers in France, Italy, and Germany, kicking off their own Europe-wide anti-trust investigation – later folding into that probe a similar move by the Competition Authority in the UK to examine the Agency Agreement.

It was also widely reported late last year that a U.S. Justice Department investigation, along similar lines, had commenced.

On top of that, it’s over six months since the law firm of Hagens Berman announced a class action suit against the same five publishers, and Apple, for the (alleged) price-fixing of e-books. (Interestingly, the same firm which launched a…

View original post 2,277 more words

Promotional Herding

Yes, I still have a ways to go before I complete my novel and really shouldn’t worry about the Big Promotional Machine, but marketing and promoting thoughts still permeate the tangle of noodles that I try to pass off as my brain. I find the post-writing world just as fascinating as the writing world itself. I’ve been reading a wide variety of a blogs and keeping up with independent publishing websites. While working on this blog post, I remembered a concept which I think would be a great help in the realm of marketing and promoting your literary work.

I am a semi-retired comic book nerd. While I no longer participate in the reading of current comics, I have a tight and dedicated library of comics, both dramatic and comedic. But, back in the heyday of the late 90s, I was firmly entrenched of the Wednesday release date of the weekly comic book. And during the summer of 1997, I came across a promotional comic that tied-in with three independent comic book creators during convention season.

The Trilogy Tour.

I’ve found links from one of the creators of the Trilogy Tour, Jeff Smith. He and two other creators, Charles Vess and Linda Medley, pooled their resources and went on the road together to promote their books. They were like three one-act bands going on tour.

Pretty awesome if you ask me.

And not only were they one-acts, but they also backed each other up. Three soloists have an enhanced and different sound when they work together as duets or trios. And that’s pretty cool.

As they’re able to pool their money, they could make promotional items such as a comic that included one original story from each of them. Not only was this a great way to get their work out to the public, there was a demand from fans of their work who wanted to add to their collection. And yes, I was (still sort of in a semi-retired way) one of those fans. And they did this for two years. Not only was the first one successful, but the following year they added three more artists, turning the tour into a collaborative road show of different talents. What a great idea.

I immediately began thinking of doing that with writers. If given the chance, I would love to work alongside other writers and, while being our own solo act, promote our works as a collective, helping each other out. And maybe even put together a short book of original stories, one from each of us. Not only would our work get out into more hands, but the price of manufacturing and such would go down as would all share the burden of costs.

While I’m not near the point of promoting works, especially in person, I think it’s a great concept and one I felt like sharing. Perhaps in the next summer or two, I’d love to go on the road with other writers (including comic creators) to show the world, and one another, our passion for The Word.

Cheers.

-SJn

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