Tag Archives: Online Writing

Readwave and Scribd: places for writers & readers

Quick and informative post about reader/writer sites:

Dr Suzanne Conboy-Hill - finding fiction

Readwave is a well-presented site for writers-looking-for-readers and readers looking for something bite-sized to read. Anyone can post a piece of flash (800 words – longer pieces have to be broken up) and your stats are clocked up next to each entry. While I’m not sure that a ‘read’ always means what it says, you do at least know someone looked and that your treasured bit of prose isn’t all on its lonesome any more. Upload is a simple copy/paste process with boxes for title and short description, and a place to put tags.

There is a limited range of images available as headers which are rather nice but for variety and relevance, you might want to source your own. Copyright-free of course, or keeping it in-house, something you chased up on Photoshop.

Scribd is an option for longer pieces which are uploaded as documents . If you want an…

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And So It Goes…

It appears as quickly as things came, they have gone. About two months ago I was presented with the opportunity to man the helm of the Steampunk/Historical Fiction magazine for the eFiction line of magazines. I jumped at the chance and was quite excited about it. Unfortunately, I have stepped down from my position after completion of the first issue. I loved learning the basics  of what it takes to put an e-zine together as well as meeting some great new and veteran writers. I also made some great friendships and many more acquaintances within the writing industry. So, a hearty “Thank You” is given to any and all who made a part of my magazine happen. Please jump over to the Fiction Magazines website and take a look at

PROF. DOBBS’ LITERARY PRIMER FOR THE EXTRAORDINARY

While I don’t have confirmation, it appears as if the magazine is available here:

Barnes & Noble Online

Enjoy,

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Introducing Prof. Dobbs’ Literary PRIMER for the Extraordinary!

‘Prīmər  New-England_Primer

noun.

1. A small introductory book on a subject.

2. A short informative piece of writing.

Welcome ladies and gentlemen! Salutations pupils and experts! My name is Stasey Norstrom and I am the Managing Editor for Professor Dobb’s Literary Primer For The Extraordinary. I have graciously accepted the task of tending to the professor’s ever-expanding library and sharing them in monthly installments. Each issue is dedicated to those new to these exciting realms and to those experts in the field looking to broaden their horizons and continue their education.

With each issue of what I commonly call Primer, you will find a wonderful collection of stories, essays, and reviews pertaining to the gritty and delicate world of Steampunk, as well as historical fiction and alternate historical fiction. You’ll find everything from sky pirates and debutantes to civil war automatons and roman pneumatics. It’s what I call science fiction of futures’ past.

Pull up a chair with your ladies’ group or sit back in your reading room with a snifter of brandy and enjoy our words of other-worldly wisdom.

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IndieReCon

Indierecon-logo4

Now, let me first start by saying I love where I live. It’s a small town of 2,200 and we’re the largest of 5 towns around a “major” city of about 14,000 people. Yes, it’s small. We’re about an hour’s drive from somewhere else and about 2 1/2 hours away from an actual city. The kind of city which has really good food–not just “good enough”–and toilets that flush themselves. Since civilization is so far away, it’s not often that one gets a chance to enjoy such things, let alone special events such as concerts, the choice to see a movie other than the 3 offered in town, and what I’ve affectionately dubbed “Word Nerd Herding”. Other people refer to this as Literary Events or Conventions or Seminars or other such gathering-type noun.

I used to live outside of Portland, Oregon, and there is a great annual literary “festival” (add that to the list) called Wordstock. I’m sure there are dozens of them across the country and hundreds abroad. Unfortunately, living where I do, it make’s it a bit challenging to make a six-hour drive one way to attend a seven or eight-hour festival and then drive back. And even if I stayed over-night, It’s still a lot of expensive driving back and forth.

So…what to do?

A short while back I met a fellow novelist, S.R. Johannes, and from her site I learned about IndieReCon. IndieReCon states they are “the premiere online writer’s conference for the independently minded”. After looking through the site and what was being offered, the conclusion I came to was…cool.

The conference (missed that noun too) is run by and focused towards the self-published “Indie” writers, which many authors nowadays have become. Now, one of things that has drawn me to this conference is the location and admission fees:

Online and free.

That’s a nice combination.

I’m signed up for next year’s gathering scheduled the weekend of 2.19.13-2.21.13. I think it’ll be interesting to see how the virtual conference goes. I hope to make some new acquaintances  and attend some panels with people scattered across the planet. That sounds pretty cool.

Check it out.

I’ll…see?…you there.

Cheers.

-SJn

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“Next”

English: Dead tree Deutsch: Abgestorbener Baum

English: Dead tree Deutsch: Abgestorbener Baum (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Weathered hands take turns holding up her head and running though her hair, locking knuckles to keep from doing either. Shoulders sit too high, pressed against her head to keep it from crashing onto the counter. She barely stands, an uprooted tree with a too frail trunk struggling to keep her knobby limbs attached. Her blonde canopy is thin, withered and cracked with bleach. A growing nest of dark roots perch on top.

Another woman behind the counter smiles, patient, yin to frustrated yang. She has warm chocolate  eyes and cheeks creased with years of smile and laughter.

“Copay,” falls out of the dead tree’s mouth, consonants hard and cold. Weak fingers reach inside her purse and nerves take over. Contents fly like shrapnel: a cell phone snaps awake, a too-big keychain rattles the room awake. She socially attempts to ignore the two tampons and shoves everything back inside. She finds her prize and tosses it onto the counter.

“Here,” and her insurance card falls dead into the happy woman’s lap.

Welcome to the Waiting Room.

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Interview: What I Did With My Summer (and Spring) Vacations – OR – Where Has The Time Gone?

Interview

Interview (Photo credit: smiling_da_vinci)

Me: Well, hello there. It’s been a long time. How are you?

You: [pleasant and appropriate response. Pleasant return question.]

Me: I’m fine. A little tired right now (without proper caffeine, 4-ish hours of sleep tends to make one a touch tired), but otherwise I’m hanging in there.

You: [agreeing response. Friendly inquiry as to my goings on these past four-five months.]

Me: What have I been up to? Well, let’s see: my wife brought into our world a brand-spanking new beautiful baby girl. She showed up a bit earlier than we had planned and so we spent some extra time to make sure she was ready to come home. And since she’s been home, I’ve found it near impossible to stop chewing on her toes and to keep from staring into her steel blue eyes all day. Her laugh is deep and her smile is pure joy.

She’s magic.

You: [amazed response with heartfelt congratulations. Comment along the lines of, “sounds like you’ve been busy”.]

Me: Indeed. On top of that, we decided to move during this summer as well. Granted, the move was in-town (a whopping 0.4 miles between homes), but doing the majority of it with an infant did provide its fair share of challenges. Fortunately, we have some awesome friends that helped with the big pieces and together we got all moved in and (most) boxes unpacked.

You: [general inquiry as to the progression of writing or other projects.]

Me:  With the arrival of the little one, I did put Jac And The City of 1,000 Worlds on hold while we adjusted to a new life and a new routine and new sleeping schedules. I’ve spent the last month reacquainting myself with Jac and her accidental adventure. I was really excited to find out that I really like the story. While that may sound a bit odd for a writer to say that, I spent many years looking at stories I had completed and hating them or spending my time thinking about how I could have made them better.

You: [off-handed comment regarding degrading one’s own work.]

Me: A bit ridiculous, isn’t it? I spent a long time languishing in the classic and self-induced Struggling Artist where nothing is good enough and all attempts end up in gnashing of teeth, tearing up my work, and casting them into the flames of my own creative misery.

Not exactly the most productive way to spend one’s time.

You: [absolute agreement.]

Me: So, now I look back at my previous (and current) works with joy and pride. Even in my younger years, the stories I wrote, are great ones. While the tools and language of my trade were not yet fully developed, it’s great to see and recognize that I have come a long way from my hormone and angst-filled days of high school. Thankfully.

You: [genuine gladness with the new ideology.]

Me: Me too.

You: [general inquiry into anything else I want to discuss.]

Me: I want to say thank you to everyone who has and continues to support me. My friends, my awesome beta-reader (relax! the book ain’t writing itself you know!), and my extended and immediate family. I have three wonderful children and I count my blessings every time I think of them. But, most important of all, is my wife. By far the most impatiently patient woman I have ever known, he

r love and support and encouragement drive me to become a better writer, father, and husband. While I may spend a lot of my time with my head in the clouds, she’s there to make sure I don’t drift off into space.

Thank you, honey. I love you so much.

You: [happiness with my sentiments.]

Me: I think we’ll need to wrap things up here on my end. I have a sleeping baby and that’s precious time to write and to do the laundry.

Take care.

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Origins

 “Who knows where thoughts come from, they just appear.”  -Lucas from Empire Records

Over the last year or so, I’ve had some people ask me where I got the idea for my current book, Jac and the City of 1,000 Worlds? What was the inspiration behind a 7th grade girl going on an unintentional journey to Meridian, a city at the center of 1,000 different worlds?

I don’t know.

For a good number of my stories, I’ve been able to find–at times odd–reasoning behind the spark of my ideas.

Many ideas have been due to a direct influence from already published works by my favorite authors. Neil Gaiman‘s novel Neverwhere and The Sandman series were huge influences in many of the stories I wrote 10 or more years ago, as was Warren Ellis and his graphic novel series, Transmetropolitan. And 15 years ago I was introduced to Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury. While I knew Disney’s film adaptation of the book, I had never known the brilliance of Bradbury’s writing.

At times it’s been a result of statements that I or others have made. The creative seed for a comic series I wrote almost 20 years ago was something along the lines of me saying, “Wouldn’t it suck to have your hand bitten off by a demon?” And from there, my first completed project, CHANCE, was born.

I suppose I do know where my thoughts come from, at least in a creative sense (my wife would beg to differ that just about all of my thoughts come out of a certain part of my body that rhymes with bass, gas, and mass). Perhaps the ideas were bits from a dream that slipped into the waking world. Perhaps they come from the world around me and I piece ideas and images together which then slide into my mind.  Whatever the origin of a story is from, I’m blessed to be able to cultivate them into a work of fiction.

But, getting back to the original question posed at the beginning of this post, I must say in this particular instance, the original idea that gave birth to Jac and her incredible adventure was this:

I have no idea.

But I love it.

Stay tuned.

Cheers.

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Greetings!

Welcome to S.J. Norstrom’s blog! Here you will find everything related to my novels, short stories, and all things literary.

Please be sure to Follow my blog so you can receive up-to-minute posts about my work and other bits I want to pass on to you. In the coming days I will be posting some of my published short stories so be sure to come back.

And don’t forget to comment on my future posts. There’s nothing better than connecting directly with the fans and I look forward to it!

Cheers!

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